We will remember them – Remembrance 2013

Oct 9, 2013   //   by NavyLookout   //   Articles  //  Be the first to comment...
At this time of year when we pay tribute those who gave their lives in service of their country, it seems appropriate to focus here on just a few examples of the sacrifice made by the men of the Royal Navy.
Poppy pin
Buy your Poppy Pin here from www.forever-jack.com
£3.25 (inc. p&p) with profits to the Royal British Legion Poppy appeal

Lynx helicopter crew from HMS Portland, Cornish Coast, December 2004

While on a nightime search and rescue mission for a man reported lost overboard from HMS Montrose, a Lynx helicopter launched from HMS Portland suddenly plunged into the water giving the crew no chance of escape. The cause of the crash has never been properly established and the man overboard report proved false. 4 men died that night Lt David Cole, Lt Robert Dunn, Lt Jamie Mitchell and LAEM Richard Darnell. This illustrates the constant dangers faced by servicemen even in peacetime.

HMS Fearless’ Landing Craft – Foxtrot Four (LCU F4), Falklands, 8th June 1982

Ignoring orders to await the safety of nightfall, knowing the importance of getting equipment forward to where it was needed, LCU F4 set out in daylight and was sunk by bombs and cannon fire from 4 Argentine Skyhawk aircraft in Choiseul Sound. 6 brave men, Royal Marines and Sailors were lost; Colour Sergeant Brian Johnston QGM, Sergeant R.J. Rotherham, Marine R.D. Griffin, Marine A.J. Rundle, LMEM D. Miller and MEA A.S. James.

HMS Fearless LCU F4

HMS Fearless’ LCU F4 in the Falklands

HMS Keith, Dunkirk, 1940

HMS Kieth During the operations to evacuate British and French soldiers from Dunkirk as the Germans closed in, destroyer HMS Keith bravely made several trips from Dover to the bombed beaches of Dunkirk helping to evacuate hundreds of soldiers. On one occasion she was hit by a mortar bomb and machine gun fire that killed her captain and wounded many others. On 1st June she made her last trip, finally succumbing to a bomb which went down her funnel and exploded in the engine room. 3 officers and 33 ratings were killed during the attacks.

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old: Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning We will remember them.

Remembrance 2012. We will remember them…

Nov 1, 2012   //   by NavyLookout   //   Articles  //  3 Comments
At this time of year when we pay tribute those who gave their lives in service of their country, it seems appropriate to focus here on just a few examples of the sacrifice made by the men of the Royal Navy.

 

Poppy pin
Buy your Poppy Pin here from www.forever-jack.com
£3.25 (inc. p&p) with profits to the Royal British Legion Poppy appeal

LOM Paul McCann and OM Anthony Huntrod, HMS Tireless, March 2007
Both sailors were killed when a faulty oxygen generator candle exploded while the submarine was operating under ice near the North Pole. This tragic accident illustrates the inherent dangers present for all who serve at sea which can happen without warning even when not in action against an enemy.

AB Iain Boldy AB Matthew  Stuart, Falklands War, May 1982, HMS Argonaut 
On 21 May 1982 HMS Argonaut was part of the escort for the amphibious vessels during the amphibious landing at San Carlos Water. Argonaut was attacked twice by Argentine aircraft and on the second attack 2 bombs hit the ship, fortunately they did not explode but went deep into the ship and killed these 2 young sailors who were later buried at sea. The Royal Navy’s escort ships suffered the majority of the Argentine air attacks, thus protecting the vulnerable landing ships and ensuring that British forces got ashore successfully to liberate the islands.

HMS Argonaut Returns form the Falklands

HMS Argonaut returns to Devonport after the Falklands war with repair to bomb hole clearly visible.

HMS Gladiolus, North Atlantic, October 1941
The Battle of the Atlantic was the longest continuous campaign of the second world war. As an island nation Britain was (and still is) highly dependent on imported goods arriving by sea. The unglamorous, often forgotten Atlantic naval struggle was key to allied victory. To protect them from the submarine menace, the convoys that crossed the Atlantic had to be escorted by the destroyers, corvettes, frigates and sloops of the Royal Navy throughout the war.
HMS Gladiolus
Often in terrible weather, the sailors had to endure the dangers as well as cold, wet and cramped conditions in small ships that had been built hastily during the war. HMS Gladiolus was a ‘Flower class’ corvette, amongst the smallest and most basic of the escort vessels. This gallant little ship and her crew of 65 officers and men disappeared without trace in October 1941, probably sunk by German U-boat U553.

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old: Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning We will remember them.

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