Established in 2007, we are an independent voice. Save The Royal Navy is an online campaign but not an organisation as such. The owners of the site are informed and interested civilians with contributors and supporters which include ex-forces personnel and academics. We have no direct links with the Ministry of Defence, neither are we aligned to any political organisation. Author’s names and biographies are not usually published on the site.

We strongly welcome contributions from everyone and encourage comments on the articles. Whatever your point of view, we welcome friendly and civil debate.

We are looking for new writers to submit articles for this site. If you are interested please contact us. (See our editorial guidelines).

Values

  • We are not aligned to any political party.
  • We think Britain can avoid future conflict by maintaining peace and stability through armed deterrence. We reject the arguments of CND and those advocating unilateral disarmament as dangerous and unrealistic. We must retain forces to protect ourselves.
  • We do not live in an ideal world and there will be times when we must meet aggressors and terrorists with force. Use of force should always be a last resort.
  • We advocate stronger armed forces and increased respect for our serving personnel past and present and are committed to having forces that serve the democracy.

Aims

  • To put pressure on the government to properly resource the RN. To provide a major increase in funding to redress decades of cuts and neglect.
  • To promote the Royal Navy and to highlight the excellent work it does on a daily basis across the globe.
  • To provide an independent and honest assessment of state the RN, free from government or political spin, available online and in language that the layman can understand.
  • To see service personnel treated fairly, valued and properly paid particularly those who are risking their lives on a daily basis and those who have sustained injuries, both physical and mental while serving their country in a succession of conflicts.

 

We take no pleasure in charting the decline of the Royal Navy and highlighting the effects of cuts and government folly. Despite the difficult circumstances, there are still plenty of good news and success stories which are covered and celebrated.