Beyond Endurance: An Epic of Whitehall and the South Atlantic Conflict

The campaign to re-take the Falkland Islands in 1982, was one of the most remarkable episodes in the long history of British overseas adventures. Nearly all the books that have appeared in the ensuing years have dealt with the campaign itself. Nicholas Barker takes a rather different view, concerning himself more with the reason why the British had to fight in what, as he says, has justifiably been called ‘a totally unnecessary war’. No one was better placed than he to blow aside the many smokescreens that have, in his view, been deliberately fanned to obscure the reasons why the war was fought. For Nick Barker was at the time Captain of Endurance, the only British presence in the South Atlantic. The Government’s decision to dispose of Endurance was seen as a clear signal to the Argentinians that Britain was not committed to the Falkland Islands. Nick Barker’s vivid account of his fight to save his ship, of the life of the South Atlantic and of the part that Endurance played in the Falklands makes enthralling reading.
£12.95 GBP
£12.95 GBP

Phoenix Squadron: HMS Ark Royal, Britain’s last Topguns and the untold story of their most dramatic mission

£12.99 GBP

A perfect demonstration of the power and flexibility of carrier air power. In 1972 the appearance of Buccaneer aircraft from HMS Ark Royal instantly deterred Guatemalan aggression against British Honduras.

Up in Harm’s Way: Flying with the Fleet Air Arm

This book covers the author’s flying career from the finish of World War II until his final appointment as CO of the Naval Test Squadron at Boscombe Down. Having had an outstanding wartime record ‘Mike’ Crosley became heavily involved with the introduction of Britain’s first carrier-borne jet aircraft. The book explains how modern techniques, such as the angled flight deck, steam catapult and decklanding mirror sights were developed and tested. At Boscombe down he developed the ‘hand’s-off’ launch technique for the Buccaneer which saved it from probable cancellation at a very difficult time for British naval aviation.
£15.99 GBP
£15.99 GBP

The Silent Service

£8.99 GBP
£8.99 GBP

One of the great untold stories of the British services is that of the Royal Navy Submarine Service which entered the fray in World War I with 100 underwater craft. Through World War II, where submariners’ prospects of returning safely from a mission were only 50:50, the Falklands conflict and the sinking of the Belgrano, to present-day elite machines, the Silent Service has played an enormous part in British defence. John Parker’s in-depth investigation is very much personality led with diaries from the early part of the century to substantial first-person testimony from survivors of wartime heroics (when many VCs were won).

My Bloody Efforts: Life as a Rating in the Modern Royal Navy

In May 2000 the British nuclear ‘hunter-killer’ submarine HMS Tireless limped into Gibraltar using emergency propulsion and with her nuclear reactor shut down. Days earlier, while traversing the Straits of Sicily the crew had discovered a crack in one of the nuclear reactor pipes, requiring the immediate shutting down of the reactor to prevent a potential reactor accident, an operation never before conducted on a British submarine at sea. Th e previous six days had been a difficult time for the crew of the submarine. Initial indications of a nuclear reactor defect had quickly escalated into a full scale potential nuclear reactor accident at sea, requiring decisive action by the crew to make the reactor safe, to identify the defect and attempt to repair the reactor, and then to surface the submarine and to sail her safely back to the nearest safe harbor using emergency propulsion machinery designed for very limited use. The resulting lack of electrical power resulted in the crew having to sacrifice lighting, air-conditioning, bathing facilities and even hot food until their return to harbor, and to suffer in the excessively hot interior of the boat. Throughout, there remained the fear of exposure to deadly radiation and the uncertainty that the reactor might still be one step away from a major accident. For one man onboard, this episode formed the culmination of a 25 year naval engineering career almost fated for this moment. Charge Chief Stephen Bridgman, the senior nuclear propulsion technician, had needed all of his engineering knowledge and experience in the identification and eventual repair of the submarine reactor, subsequently being awarded an MBE together with a colleague for his services to naval engineering for his actions. This book provides an insight into a remarkable naval career starting as a 16 year old Stoker on the final ‘proper’ British aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal in 1977, through the Falklands War, being selected for naval technician training
£22.95 GBP
£22.95 GBP
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